Frequently Asked Questions

FairMail offers a positive product that provides a concrete, direct and effective contribution to combating poverty. FairMail is also a so called Fairtrade products. A claim we want to prove by being transparent about how FairMail works and how the Fair Trade certification works.

FairMail: about the company

 

FairMail and the cards

 

FairMail and Fairtrade

 

FairMail and the teenage photographers

 

FairMail and the UN Millennium Goals

 

FairMail and the Environment

 

The Answers to the questions above:

 

Where did the name FairMail come from?

When we wanted to come with a fair trade alternative for regular postcards we thought FairMail sounded good because it sounds almost like Air Mail. Just adding the letter F makes clear that sending FairMail is the right thing to do when sending a card to someone. Why?

Because we believe that the country that provides the beauty on third world photo greeting cards should receive a fair share of the profit. Contrary to other card brands, that use western photographers, western printers and are published by western companies. At FairMail the money stays where the beauty comes from: the local teenage photographers, the local print shop, the national tax authority under which we are registered and the local exporting agent that sends the cards to our consumers. That way we maximize the added value being added on top of the local beauty as possible and make sure those earnings stay where they belong. Sounds like a fair deal doesn’t it? Sounds like FairMail.

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What is FairMail’s mission?

1) to bring a beautiful and new product on the market. The FairMail photo card is a 100% Peruvian/Indian product that creates an income for Peruvian/Indian underprivileged teenagers, print shops, transport companies and other local providers. This aspect is innovative because in the current supply of cards with ¨Third World¨ images all photos are made by western professionals. Furthermore the cards are printed in rich countries in amongst others the USA and Europe. The message we send with FairMail is: let the country that provides us with beautiful images benefit from the incomes created!

2) to offer oppertunities for a better future to underprivileged teenagers, which they THEMSELVES create; by developing their creativity (through photography) and their self-esteem (through job experience, new skills and having their own product) so that they can choose their future paths more consciously. With the money they earn in FairMail they can finance the education they need to realize these futures.

3) to stimulate awareness raising about using local beauty to create local incomes, about seeing life through the eyes of teenagers and about fair-trade.

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What are the characteristics of a FairMail’s product?

FairMail cards have 3 main characteristics: beauty, originality and fair-trade:

Beauty: we see the quality of the photo and the card as the first and most important aspect of our product. Fair-trade is good, but even better if it can compete in popularity and quality with the regular market. FairMail offers cards with universal beauties & themes so that you can find a suitable card for every occasion.

Originality: a photo card made IN a developing country BY its local youth is a new product on the card market. FairMail cards are 100% Peruvian/Indian. The photos are made by Peruvian/Indian teenagers: former street children that now live in a boy’s home and teens living as garbage recyclers near a city dump. The cards are printed in a print shop in Trujillo, Peru. It’s just the Dutch initiator and manager that isn’t Peruvian about this product!

Fair-trade: FairMail cards are fair trade because we involve underprivileged teenagers in the card production process. We offer these youngsters the opportunity to develop themselves by giving them training, part-time work and medical insurance. Working for FairMail they learn new skills, get job experience and learn to see beauty and positive aspects in their surroundings. Furthermore, the teenagers use 50 % of FairMail’s profit to finance the education they need.

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Why is FairMail a company and not a charity foundation?

Because at FairMail we believe in “Trade NOT Aid”. Especially for the healthy and talented teenagers we have trained to take the pictures. Just because they had bad luck to be born in economically poor conditions or instable families does not mean they need to depend on aid to improve their chances in life. In fact we believe that making them dependant on aid negatively influences the teenager’s development. By giving them the tools to take their own destiny into their own hands they get much more self esteem as it is only thanks to their own efforts they have managed to improve themselves. By working hard, being creative and making a product that consumers will actually buy you can take care of yourself. That is what we want to teach our teenage photographers.

So FairMail as a company should at least give the right example and be self sufficient. FairMail receives no subsidies, grants or funds and sustains its operations entirely with the income from its sales. The second advantage is that by involving the teenagers in the running of the business and making their earnings dependant on the company’s earnings they are very motivated to keep the costs low and earnings high. Only that way can they earn money to finance their educational dreams. That’s why we never loose any cameras, the kids turn off the light when they leave the office and take good care of the computers.

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How did FairMail start off?

The idea behind Fairmail started in June 2006 in Peru, where the two Dutch pioneers, Janneke Smeulders and Peter den Hond, where already living for 3 years by then and working in their own vegetarian restaurant (see www.otracosa.info). In their spare time they volunteered at a boys home for streetchildren (see www.mundodeninos.org) and a community centre next to Trujillo’s garbagedump (see www.ymcaperu.org). There they got to know the teenagers that later entered FairMail.

During her volunteering Janneke noticed that other volunteers always took pictures of the teenagers but never let the teenagers use the “interesting” camera, afraid it would get broken. So for her next class Janneke decided to bring her own digital camera and finally “empower” the teenagers to take pictures themselves. They absolutely LOVED it! Taking pictures was fun, the camera a high-tech gadget and the pictures where actually quiet interesting.

Still Janneke felt strange though she was teaching the kids a new hobby that could only be frustrated as the teenagers would never have the money to buy a camera themselves. Plus their biggest problem, getting out of poverty, was not being solved this way. Then she connected i) the fun of taking pictures with ii) the pictures coming out of it with iii) the possible income that could be generated by the sale of the pictures once they where printed on postcards. That’s when she started the Peruvian company FairMail Peru by teaching 5 local teenagers photography skills.

After winning the Business in Development Challenge in September 2006 FairMail Peru started selling its postcards to the Dutch World Shops. During spring of 2007 the pioneers decided to expand the concept of FairMail over the rest of the world with the goal of having 3 different production and 6 sales countries by 2012. The Netherlands was chosen as distribution country for the products coming from the different production countries (up till now Peru and India, with Marocco being added in 2011). For this purpose the Dutch based distributor FairMail Cards was initiated in September 2007 as trading organization of "FairMail International". FairMail Cards trades 90% of the products to main stream and fair trade shops in the Netherlands, the UK, Germany and Belgium. But also sells through the FairMail webshop and to corporate clients looking for fair trade photography. The other 10% is sold in the production countries (mainly Peru so far).

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Who are FairMail’s teenage photographers?

All photos on FairMail cards are taken by Peruvian and Indian teenagers. The youth FairMail works with lives in relatively poor circumstances. The Peruvian teenagers either live in a boy’s home for ex-street children (called Mundo de Niños) or they (or their families) earn money by recycling garbage at Trujillo’s garbage dump and participate in the program of the YMCA Peru. The Indian teenagers live in the Nagwa slum near Varanasi where many inhabitants make a living from collecting cow dung for fuel production.

At the moment (2010) we work with a total of 27 youngsters from Huanchaco and Trujillo in northern Peru and Varanasi in North eastern India. Click here for more information about the teenage photographers of FairMail.

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What is the difference between FairMail cards and other cards sold in shops?

Many photos of developing countries are taken by WESTERN photographers, printed in WESTERN countries and sold by WESTERN companies. So it is the WEST that is earning the money. Our philosophy is that “the country that provides the beauty on the photos should be benefiting from the profits being made.”

Through FairMail, the people who benefit from these products include: the local photographers, their family, the local printing company, the local mail company, the National tax institutions as well as FairMail’s national managers in India and Peru. That is fair trade according to FairMail.

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Where exactly does the profit of the cards sale go to?

FairMail is a company that provides in its own income and does not receive any subsidies, grants or donations. Just as with other companies the income is used to cover the company’s costs. In a profitable company (like FairMail) the income is greater then the costs and thus a profit is attained. At FairMail 50% of the profit goes into the personal education funds of the photographers. The other 50% stays in the company and is saved for investments for the present and future. If the financial situation allows it, profit dividend is turned out to the investment shareholders. FairMail has three equal shareholders. These shareholders are the two initiators and a social ethical investor from the Netherlands. The national managers of FairMail Peru and FairMail India each receive 12% of the profits on top of their regular wage.

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Then shouldn’t FairMail cards be more expensive then other cards?

FairMail is the Fair trade coffee amongst the world of greeting cards. Just as with fair trade coffee, fair trade cards don’t have to be more expensive if the volume of sales is high. You do pay for a premium product though, because besides buying a quality product you are also contributing to creating a better world!

FairMail is a company that has higher costs because of its special way of working. FairMail provides free training photography training to the teenagers, which costs a lot of time and money. The same goes for the guidance in their personal development. Besides the end product with FairMail the process is also really important. That is the development process of our teenage photographers.

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What is it that makes FairMail Fair Trade?

FairMail adheres to the fairtrade criteria established by the World Fair Trade Organization (WFTO) and the Dutch Association of World Shops (LVWW). In fact FairMail is fairtrade certified by the LVWW and a monitored member of the WFTO which both check if FairMail keeps complying with the fair trade criteria. Membership of the WFTO is limited to organizations that demonstrate a 100% Fair Trade commitment and apply its 10 Principles of Fair Trade. This means that FairMail Cards (as only card supplier from Peru and India!) is being checked on:

  • Complying with the most important conventions of the World Labour Organizations (WLO) with respect to exploitation of child labour, forced labour, equal rights and freedom to unionize etc.,
  • Pay more than a liveable wage to its employees and providing secondary labour benefits like health insurance for the teenagers and their families.
  • Offer safe and hygienic working conditions for its employees,
  • Have an internal environmental policy.
  • Support producer groups in Peru and India so they can sell their products better in the west.,
  • Be transparent about the financial bookkeeping which is checked by the LVVWW every at least 3 years.

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Is FairMail really Fair Trade?

FairMail can proudly declare to be fair trade because it has been recognized as such by the Dutch Association of World Shops (LVWW) and is a monitored member of the World Fair Trade Organization (WFTO). The LVWW has a very strict set of criteria for non-food products coming from developing countries to be sold as “fair trade product in the World Shops. Membership of the WFTO is limited to organizations that demonstrate a 100% Fair Trade commitment and apply its 10 Principles of Fair Trade. This means that FairMail Cards (as only card supplier from Peru and India!) is being checked on:

  • Complying with the most important conventions of the World Labour Organizations (WLO) with respect to exploitation of child labour, forced labour, equal rights and freedom to unionize etc.,
  • Pay more than a liveable wage to its employees and providing secondary labour benefits like health insurance for the teenagers and their families.
  • Offer safe and hygienic working conditions for its employees,
  • Have an internal environmental policy.
  • Support producer groups in Peru and India so they can sell their products better in the west.,
  • Be transparent about the financial bookkeeping which is checked by the LVVWW every at least 3 years.

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Who checks to see if FairMail complies with the criteria for Fair Trade?

This checking is done by the Dutch Association of World Shops (LVWW). FairMail chose for this certification because it has the strictest and best ethically structured procedure (which is reflected in the price) to recognize providers of “non food” Fair Trade products. There are other certifications schemes including the well known “FairTrade mark” but they only certify agricultural products like cotton, coffee and bananas (and now soccer balls!). Other certifying organizations like the WFTO (World Fair Trade Organization) have softer controlling mechanisms of self-inspection. Given all the options the LVVWW sets the strictest guidelines to make sure we are truly Fair Trade. Plus to make sure we carry on complying an inspector actually comes to Peru and India to check our fair-trade application at the start and every 3 years afterwards.

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What is fair trade?

Fair trade stands for an equitable way of doing business with developing countries with sincere attention to the following points:

  • respect for humans and the environment,
  • a sustainable business relationship,
  • support in product development and
  • transparency in the trading chain.

 

Products must be made and traded in a respectful way for people and the environment. This can be practiced in different ways. Each individual involved in the trading chain will improve the situation of women and the absence of discrimination on the basis of race, sex or religion. Producers have to assure decent working conditions for their personal and give them the freedom to organize themselves in labour unions. Their activities are safe and the environment and children are not exploited. If children are helping with the production that should not be on a big scale and not have an obligatory character. Besides that children should be going to school and have free time. Producers should receive a “liveable wage”. Producers should be able to make a decent living in their specific circumstances. If they were to work full-time their wage should allow them to buy food, clothing, shelter, business equipment and be able to send their children to school.

The exact amount of the liveable wage is hard to define and standardize. What you need to earn to make a decent living differs per country and even part of a country. In the areas where FairMail is active the local liveable wages have been defined as follows: In Trujillo, Peru the local liveable wage is set at 880 nuevo soles (2010) per month and in Varanasi, India at 4900 rupee per month (2010) on the basis of 48 hours of work per week.

Sustainable Trade Relationship

Importers of fair trade products commit themselves to an enduring trading relationship with the producers. This offers them the long term guarantee of being able to sell. An upfront payment can also help the producers.

Provide support with product development and business management

Besides the security of a long term business relationship, the producers also deserve support and advice. This includes development of their company and their products in the form of advice, credits or mediation. But also by providing information about wishes and expectations of the consumers in the west, which would enable them to better sell their products. Or by finding new entrances to new markets for the products. By providing support where necessary, the producer’s organizations become stronger and more independent. The ultimate goal is that producers are empowered to sell their products outside the fair trade market and to grow further.

Transparency in the trade chain

In the fair trade chain all partners are transparent about their acting and way of doing business. This transparency is important for the reliability of the whole chain.

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Who are FairMail’s teenage photographers?

All photos on FairMail cards are taken by Peruvian and Indian teenagers. The youth FairMail works with lives in relatively poor circumstances. The Peruvian teenagers either live in a boy’s home for ex-street children (called Mundo de Niños) or they (or their families) earn money by recycling garbage at Trujillo’s garbage dump and participate in the program of the YMCA Peru. The Indian teenagers live in the Nagwa slum near Varanasi where many inhabitants make a living from collecting cow dung for fuel production.

At the moment (2010) we work with a total of 27 youngsters from Huanchaco and Trujillo in northern Peru and Varanasi in North eastern India. Click here for more information about the teenage photographers of FairMail.

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How are FairMail’s teenage photographers selected?

FairMail works with economically deprived teenagers. As there are many in both Peru and India we cooperate with local NGO's working with at risk teenagers in order to select the teenagers that really can use an oppertunity in life. In Peru these are Mundo de Ninos (boys home for street children) and ACJ El Milagro (community centre on the garbage belt). In India this is Dunya Foundation (educational project in Nagwa slums). All of FairMail's teenagers come from these institutions, which means they also receive social and pshycological assistance outside FairMail. Whenever there is a vacancy in FairMail the teenagers between 13 and 15 years old from these institutions can apply for a trial period. During this perion they will be evaluated on basis of their respoonsibility, motivation and photography talent. After 1 month the highest qualifying teenager gets the "job".

By working this way we are sure to be working with teenagers that have had little oppertunities in life, but are already self determined to make a personal effort to improve their situation.

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How do the teenagers benefit from FairMail?

The benefits of FairMail for the teenagers can be divided into financial and personal development benefits:

Financial benefits:

As stated on each card next to the photo of the photographer 50% of the profit of the sale of THAT card goes to THAT photographer. This money is deposited once every quarter in the personal education fund of THAT photographer. Besides financing their education they can also use 25% to make improvements to their housing conditions. Additionally we also deposit 40 soles a month (approximately 10 Euros) into their medical insurance fund for them and their direct family to use (In India this is 600 rupees a month). And to complete it they receive an hourly wage for packing activities that they can use in any way they wish. Over the first half of 2010 the total of these financial benefits amounted to an average of 157% of the liveable wage in Trujillo, Peru and 168% of the liveable wage in Varanasi, India.

Personal development benefits:

Besides earning money, FairMail provides an important contribution to each teenager’s personal development. From the age of 13 they get the opportunity to work in a unique company where they gain valuable work experience and develop their creativity:

- In order for the teenager to gain true work experience we require that they are punctual, motivated and responsible as they would be in any job. This is stated in their participation contract. If the teenagers don’t comply with this, after a few warnings they will be asked to leave FairMail. FairMail chooses to only work with motivated and responsible teenagers who want to go for improving their future.

-We offer creative development via our free photography training. From the first day the teenager sees first hand how to use a creative idea to earn money to live by. They learn to see that they don’t necessarily have to do the same work as their parents if this is not where their passion and talent lies. They learn to develop their own personal future path and with the money earned at FairMail they can finance their new educational dream. It is NOT FairMail’s goal to train the teenagers to become professional photographers after they leave FairMail. Photography is only used as a means to become more self secure, more creative and to earn money to study for what they really want to become.

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Where exactly does the profit of the cards sale go to?

FairMail is a company that provides in its own income and does not receive any subsidies, grants or donations. Just as with other companies the income is used to cover the company’s costs. In a profitable company (like FairMail) the income is greater then the costs and thus a profit is attained. At FairMail 50% of the profit goes into the personal education funds of the photographers. The other 50% stays in the company and is saved for investments for the present and future. If the financial situation allows it, profit dividend is turned out to the investment shareholders. FairMail has three equal shareholders. These shareholders are the two initiators and a social ethical investor from the Netherlands. The national managers of FairMail Peru and FairMail India each receive 12% of the profits on top of their regular wage.

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So do the teenagers get half of the money I spend when I buy a FairMail card?

No, what we promise at FairMail is that 50% of the profit made from the initial sale of the card goes to the teenage photographer who took the picture on the card. With initial sale we mean the first sale of the card by the company the teenager works for (FairMail Peru or FairMail India for example). Before the teenagers receive any money this income is used to pay for the operational costs of the company the teenager is working for (rent, cameras, printing and transport of cards, medical insurance, packing wages etc.). The money left after paying for these expenses is called the profit. Of this amount the teenagers get 50%.

So how much is that per card you might wonder? That is hard to tell as the cards have different prices depending on who we sell them to plus that the companies costs always differ too. We do know that until July of 2010 the teenagers have earned more then 37.000 euros in total with the sale of their cards. On the photographers pages you can see per teenager exactly how much he or she has earned so far.

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What do the teenagers earn per year?

That is hard to tell as the costs and income of the companies the teenagers work for changes every moneth. We do know that until July of 2010 the teenagers have earned more then 37.000 euros in total with the sale of their cards! On the photographers pages you can see per teenager exactly how much he or she has earned so far.

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What do the teenagers spend their money on?

The largest percentage of their income is spent on education with 50% of the profit going to the education of the teenager. This money the kids can spend as they wish in the education field from the paying of tuition fees (secondary school) to additional courses (like computer or cooking courses) to job training. But they can also choose to spend it on other things they need for school like glasses, shoes, back packs, books etc.

25% of the profit the teenagers can spent on making improvements to their housing situation like finally buying their own bed or fixing the roof. The money from the health insurance fund can be spent if they or someone in their direct family turns ill. The benefit of this “informal” insurance is that it can also be used at private clinics or pharmacies where some services and medicines are available which are missing in public hospitals.

The money they earn with packing the cards they can spend however they want. Mostly they spend it on music and clothes. Just like teenagers elsewhere in the world!

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What can you buy with such amounts in a country like Peru or India?

The official minimum wage in Peru is 150 euro per month (550 sol) but a lot of people have to manage with less. On the garbage dump the Peruvian parents only earn a meagre 75 euros per month and they as children earn even less. A domestic worker in Varanasi will earn as little as 40 euro a month combining different jobs. According to the criteria for Fair-trade made by the Dutch Association for World Shops the minimum liveable wage in Trujillo, Peru is 880 soles per month (250 euros) and 4900 rupee (85 euro) in Varanasi, India.

In general you could say that in most western countries things are approximately 10 times more expensive than as in Peru and even more compared to India. So according to this the liveable wage in a country like the UK would be 2.000 euro. In Peru for 1 euro you can already get a decent meal. A pair of school shoes costs 10 euro, a backpack 5 euro, glasses for 30 euro and a computer course for 50 euro and a 5 year psychology study at a private universityall inclusive about 7.500 euro. etc. In the first four years FairMail has earned about 37.000 euros in education money for a total of 27 teenagers.

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When do the teenagers get paid?

Once every quarter FairMail calculates what everyone has earned. The teenagers (and their parents) receive a clear financial overview and they can ask questions about it. In this overview it also states how much money is in their education and medical funds. This indicates how much money they can still take out of their FairMail account to pay for educational or medical costs. The funds are personal and per photographers. If you have sold a high number of cards then you will have earned more money then when you have only sold a few cards. Also some teenagers save more then others. David for example has saved up almost all of his money to go to university later on, while Cinthia spends most of her earning at once. They can decide on that themselves. FairMail just keeps track of things for them and an overview four times a year.

When the teenager wants to buy something they must go through FairMail. This is for a couple of reasons including the logistics that none of them have their own bank accounts. But most importantly we feel it’s key that we check what they spend their saved money on hence we require that they hand in the receipts for all there purchases. In general this is never a problem due to the mentality of our teenagers but this method insures that the money really goes towards education and housing rather than beer for their father or buying candy. FairMail is not meant for that.

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What are the secondary labour conditions for the teenagers?

As soon as the teenager has his or her first greeting card they receive a “FairMail participation contract”. The teenager and there parents have to read it. In the contract it states that the teenager will:

1) Participate actively in FairMail’s activities.

2) Give advance notice if he or she can’t make it.

3) Give the copyright of his or her photo’s to FairMail in order to print greeting cards

4) Go to school.

 

FairMail in return promises to:

1) Train the teenager in photography for free and provide the necessary material to take pictures like a digital camera and batteries.

2) Have an actualized and accessible bookkeeping of the different personal funds (education, health insurance and wage funds)

3) Deposit 50% of the profit per card in the education fund of the photographer who took the picture.

4) Pay wages, telephone and transportation costs on a weekly basis.

5) Save 40 soles or 600 rupee per month in each photographer’s health insurance fund which the teenager and his or her direct family can use if they get sick. The money can also be spent outside of the restricted government hospitals.

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Are the teenagers in school?

Yes, that is actually a very important rule to be working for FairMail: You must be going to school! Personal development is the goal of FairMail so if you don't want to go to school you are waisting your time in FairMail. Plus otherwise FairMail could easily be accused of child labour!

Some of our photographers have been out of school so long before entering FairMail (due to personal and economical circumstances) that they can't attend regular school yet. Or they don't want to go to university but start a business. That is fine, but you can't succeed in life if you don't at least know how to read, write and do maths. That is why a few of our teenagers use their earnings to hire a personal tutor to get them up to speed on these basics.

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What are the teenagers currently studying?

Have a look on the photographers page of this website to read what each teenager is studying now and what there plans are for the future. You can also check on their career earnings and vote on their best pictures.

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What does FairMail contribute to the UN Millennium Goals?

The most important UN Millennium Goals FairMail contributes to are:

Fighting hunger and extreme poverty:

-FairMail invests in the wellbeing and future of teenagers whom are deprived of normal developing opportunities due to their difficult living circumstances (former street children and children who used to work on the garbage dump).

-FairMail offers medical insurance to the teenagers and their families which protects them against illnesses.

-FairMail finances the education the teenagers need with an estimated 37.000 euro (50% of FairMail Peru’s profit) in the first 4 years of Fairmail.

-FairMail provides guidance with the teenagers personal development plans.

Development of “Global Partnerships”

FairMail develops global partnerships through its international trade thus spreading its message of ”local beauty for local development” over the whole world. The FairMail card raises consciousness amongst buyers about the importance of thinking global and acting local, for example by buying Fair-trade products.

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How about FairMail’s environmental policy?

FairMail believes that besides the People and Profit also the Planet should benefit from FairMail’s activities. And we like to be transparent about that.

In the office this is notable in little things like switching from paper to email with our newsletters, the solo use of rechargeable batteries, recycling ink cartridges, “greening” of our airplane tickets with Atmosfair, paying our workers to come to work with public transport and using recycled paper around the office,

On a higher level FairMail tries to support the use of environmentally friendly techniques in the Peruvian printing industry. A development which is just recently getting off the ground. But things are already moving in the right direction. Thanks to FairMail’s demand FSC certified paper is now available at our printer in Trujillo, Peru. Other local companies can now start to also make use of this service. Also our envelopes are sourced from recycled paper. And in 2010 we introduced biodegradable plastic bags to pack our double cards in! The next step is to introduce soy based ink in Peru. That would be a little revolution FairMail would like to fight for.

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Are FairMail Cards printed on FSC certified paper?

Yes, since April of 2008 they are. Since then our printer in Trujillo Peru has FSC paper available for the printing of our cards and envelopes. This garanties that the trees used to make the paper FairMail Cards are printed on are grown in responsibly managed forests. This is controlled by certifying bodies which operate on basis of the criteria established by the Forest Stewardship Council (see www.fsc.org).

 

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Are FairMail’s envelopes made of recycled paper?

Yes, since 2009 they are!


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Are the plastic bags FairMail uses to pack the cards bio-degradable?

Yes, since 2010 the cello bags we use to pack our folded greeting cards are made of corn starch!

 

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Is the ink FairMail uses for printing its cards bio-degradable?

Not yet unfortunately! It is our next and highest goal to introduce soy based printing ink to our Peruvian printer. Unfortunately FairMail is not his biggest client yet, which means we don’t have the power to push this change through yet. If FairMail keeps growing like it is now we hope that in 1 or 2 years time we will be able to print all our cards on biodegradable inks.

 

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